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Role of the Harbour Master

The Role of the Harbour Master

Ports can be busy places and, by the very nature of their business activities, may be hazardous places to work. The Harbour Master has a key role to play ensuring that people living and working in or close to the port, the port’s staff, customers or visitors to the port environment can go about their business safely. Harbour Masters must be familiar with all relevant safety, environmental and health laws at the international, national and local level.

Port Marine Operations

The safety of navigation for any vessel utilising the port and its approaches is the Harbour Master's primary concern. Harbour Masters regulate the manner in which vessels conduct their navigation in port. Most regulatory requirements are clearly set out in the form of port by-laws, general directions, Pilotage Directions etc and these clearly define what the “rules of the road” are in terms of safe navigation.

Ship Arrival

From initial information provided by the ship on draft, length overall and displacement, the Harbour Master will allocate a suitable berth and apply any restrictions he may feel necessary for the safe passage of that particular vessel in his port. Vessels arriving at a port will normally contact the port control or VTS station to receive instructions on the plan for their arrival and stay in the port. This exchange usually involves confirmation of the time the pilot will board and the berth to which the vessel is proceeding.

Harbour Masters normally designate a safe pilot-boarding area where the vessel boards her pilot who then subsequently communicates with the port authority shipping control office or VTS whilst proceeding towards the intended berth. If the vessel is exempt from pilotage, in compliance with port regulations, then clear instructions on the manner of entry and navigation will be given and the vessel will be asked to register and confirm its passage plan. The passage plan is the detailed and recorded confirmation of what the ship intends to do at every stage of its passage from the pilot station to finally arriving alongside. Any subsequent movement of the vessel, a berth shift, for example, will also be subject to passage planning.

The Harbour Master has a duty to inform vessels about any hazards or problems that may affect safe navigation, for example:

  • Any obstructions in channels or alongside berths
  • Limitations of tugs
  • Weather restrictions in the harbour or at berths
  • Any failure of any aids to navigation such as lights or buoys

Vessel Types

Ports handle a huge variety of ship types ranging from supertankers, through cruise and cargo ships, large container vessels, bulk carriers, warships, Ro-Ro vessels and ferries right down to smaller but no less important vessels such as fishing vessels and pleasure craft. Different types of vessel require different port facilities to enable then to be handled efficiently and safely. Part of the Harbour Master's role is to be fully conversant with the types of vessel that represent the port's main business and to have a thorough knowledge of their requirements whilst they are in port.

Ship's Stay in Port

The role of the Harbour Master in terminal and cargo operations will vary according to the governance of the port. The Harbour Master's advice is regularly sought during a ship’s stay by companies, organisations or government officials associated with such activities as fuel bunkering, tank cleaning and the delivery of stores, water and crew.

The Harbour Master has a role to play in determining the berthing of ships and the control of the front quay or ship-shore interface. This includes the removal or segregation of dangerous goods for a determined period on the terminal, the measures to be taken by stevedores and dockworkers to prevent safety or environmental irregularities and the accessibility to the ship-shore interface by unauthorised persons.

The success or otherwise of a ship's stay in a port will be measured by how the Master, crew and ultimately the operator/owner consider the port has met their operational requirements. Port operations must be carefully planned well in advance of the vessel's arrival alongside. There are many planning considerations for the Harbour Master but amongst the main ones are: a suitable and safe berth; provision of pilotage and tugs; confirmation of mooring resources such as linemen, line boats, mooring teams etc; liaison with stevedores on the ETA/ETD of the vessel to enable them to plan their resources for loading/discharge effectively; key loading/discharge plant and equipment availability and reliability; security requirements and liaison with statutory authorities where necessary. Another key element is a good relationship with the ship's agent who will have first-hand knowledge of the ship's requirements.

The Harbour Master’s expertise is also essential for the management of any incidents and in the timely implementation of response and emergency plans.


Port Management

In addition to the technical and statutory responsibilities of the role, today’s harbour master is increasingly involved in the day-to-day management of port operations. Increased involvement and greater responsibility for the commercial business of a port is a growing area of activity for many harbour masters.

Strategic Planning Process

If they are to remain competitive, ports must move with the times in response to global shifts in maritime trade. Strategic-level business plans must be developed. Harbour Masters may contribute to the development of a long-term master plan for the port.

Other Authorities in the Port

The Harbour Master may co-operate with a number of authorities including representatives of port state control, customs, veterinary agencies, health agencies, environmental agencies, local government and utilities.

Local Community

Ports, as with all businesses, are expected to engage with their stakeholders in an open, honest and transparent manner. Working in the port environment inevitably brings the Harbour Master into contact with the wider community. Although Harbour Masters may exercise jurisdiction over the water frontage or waterway of their port – a decision that may be determined by statute or regulation – they are also expected to consider the requirements or concerns of the community on the use of the port’s navigable area and its impact on the community.

It is not only commercial vessels that make use of a port. Recreational fisherman, diving clubs, rowing clubs, tour boat operators, visiting yachtsmen and power boat drivers, marina operators and many more must all be consulted. Conflict may arise between those pursuing different activities. The harbour master has an important role in engaging with interest groups, resolving such issues and ensuring the safety of all harbour users.

Leisure Use of Ports

Leisure activities may take many forms, including recreational boating (both power and sail), swimming, diving and organised aquatic events. The Harbour Master can mitigate the risks associated with large aquatic events through the application of safety management principles and risk assessment. However, private and irregular use of the port for recreation is difficult to monitor and control. Many ports and harbours now use their websites and social media to promulgate safety information to port users. The zoning of activities to separate, for example, swimmers from personal watercraft may be introduced. Prohibiting access to some areas may be required and will require local regulation. The focus should be on community engagement and finding a harmonious method for the co-existence of recreational activities. 

Latest News & Events

A new Ship-Port Interface Guide in pdf format focusing on eight practical measures which can support GHG emission reduction at the ship-port interface was released by IMO on 26 March.

The document can be found here:

Ship-Port Interface Guide.pdf (imo.org)

Developed by the Global Industry Alliance to Support Low Carbon Shipping (Low Carbon GIA) under the IMO-Norway GreenVoyage2050 Project, the Guide aims to support the maritime industry in achieving IMO’s emission reduction goals and contribute to greener shipping.

The eight practical measures presented in the Guide are: 

1.    Facilitate immobilisation in ports.

2.    Facilitate hull and propeller cleaning in ports.

3.    Facilitate simultaneous operations (simops) in ports.

4.    Optimize port stay by pre-clearance.

5.    Improve planning of ships calling at multiple berths in one port.

6.    Improve ship/berth compatibility through improved Port Master Data.

7.    Enable ship deadweight optimisation through improved Port Master Data. 

8.    Optimise speed between ports. 

On 7 April the European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) reported that multipurpose coastguard support via a remotely piloted surveillance system (RPAS) services had been provided at the request of the Romanian Border Police.

(See illustrations here from EMSA / Romanian authorities ©)

The RPAS system will support a number of authorities in Black Sea waters including the Romanian Naval Authority and National Agency for Fishing and Aquaculture.

It is understood that the mid-sized RPAS craft can stay in the air for up to seven hours and has a range of up to 200km. It is equipped with a camera capable of day and night operations, a sea surface scanner, a distress beacon detector and a sensor that can detect vessel positions. It can be used for a range of activities, including border control, monitoring naval traffic, search and rescue, and environmental protection. Data from the RPAS can be recorded and transferred to the EMSA RPAS data centre in real time, and then made immediately available to national authorities.

Role of Harbour Master/ Port Operations Professional
Security
Port Call Optimisation
Ship image
Vessel Traffic Services
Safety
dock image
Emergency Management
Environment

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Andreas Mai

The IHMA is pleased to present the first in its series of monthly webinars.

 

Simply click HERE to access the presentation.

 

Topic: Casualty Management - Collapsed Container Stacks on Board a 19K TEU Ship 
Speaker: Captain Andreas Mai, Harbour Master (rtd)
Session Chair: IHMA President, Captain Yoss Leclerc

Speaker Bio

Andreas is a former Master Mariner and was appointed Harbour Master for the port of Bremerhaven in 1996. In 2000 he also took over the position of Harbour Master at the port of Bremen. During his active time as Harbour Master and Director of the Governmental Port Authority, he chaired the 2004 IHMA Congress in Bremen and, for a few years, the European Harbour Masters’ Committee (EHMC). He retired from his duties at the end of last year after 24 years of service.   

 

Delivered virtually
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INTERNATIONAL SAFETY@SEA 2020 WEBINAR SERIES

Join us at this year’s annual gathering of members of the international maritime community and top practitioners as we focus on the theme “Maritime Safety: New Normal, New Paradigms”.

Hear from keynote speakers from the International Maritime Organization,The Nautical Institute, BIMCO and the International Association of Classification Societies, as we discuss topics like seafarers’ mental health & wellness, ship safety and incidents, as well as ship management in the new normal across 4 sessions.

As part of MPA’s commitment to promoting safety at sea, registration for this event is free.

Delivered virtually: 5 – 10 October 2020 | 12 months access
IHMA Congress 2020

With the theme, "The Next Wave – Navigating Towards the Digital Future, the 12th biennial Congress will be delivered virtually from 5 - 10 October, 2020.

The Congress remains the key forum for IHMA members and the global ports sector to collaborate, network, share information, and provide updates on the latest industry technology and solutions.

This year, the IHMA Congress will be transformed into a virtual global community that regularly connects over 12months. All speakers, attendees, sponsors and exhibitors will have exclusive access to the Virtual IHMA Community for Global Port & Marine Operations.

The IHMA Congress Conference itself, including keynotes, technical presentations, panels and Q&A, will be broadcast via a premium event platform in October. The post-Congress Series Program, also to be hosted via the platform will the released shortly.

The 2020 IHMA Congress is an unparalleled opportunity for maritime businesses to showcase their services and for port marine professionals from around the world to network, share their experiences and update their professional knowledge.

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Latest News & Events

IMO Ship-Port Interface Guide IMO Ship-Port Interface Guide

A new Ship-Port Interface Guide in pdf format focusing on eight practical measures which can support GHG emission reduction at the ship-port interface… FIND OUT MORE

EMSA provides enhanced surveillance capacities Romania’s border in the Black Sea

On 7 April the European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) reported that multipurpose coastguard support via a remotely piloted surveillance system (RPAS)… FIND OUT MORE

Latest News & Events

A new Ship-Port Interface Guide in pdf format focusing on eight practical measures which can support GHG emission reduction at the ship-port interface was released by IMO on 26 March.

The document can be found here:

Ship-Port Interface Guide.pdf (imo.org)

Developed by the Global Industry Alliance to Support Low Carbon Shipping (Low Carbon GIA) under the IMO-Norway GreenVoyage2050 Project, the Guide aims to support the maritime industry in achieving IMO’s emission reduction goals and contribute to greener shipping.

The eight practical measures presented in the Guide are: 

1.    Facilitate immobilisation in ports.

2.    Facilitate hull and propeller cleaning in ports.

3.    Facilitate simultaneous operations (simops) in ports.

4.    Optimize port stay by pre-clearance.

5.    Improve planning of ships calling at multiple berths in one port.

6.    Improve ship/berth compatibility through improved Port Master Data.

7.    Enable ship deadweight optimisation through improved Port Master Data. 

8.    Optimise speed between ports. 

On 7 April the European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) reported that multipurpose coastguard support via a remotely piloted surveillance system (RPAS) services had been provided at the request of the Romanian Border Police.

(See illustrations here from EMSA / Romanian authorities ©)

The RPAS system will support a number of authorities in Black Sea waters including the Romanian Naval Authority and National Agency for Fishing and Aquaculture.

It is understood that the mid-sized RPAS craft can stay in the air for up to seven hours and has a range of up to 200km. It is equipped with a camera capable of day and night operations, a sea surface scanner, a distress beacon detector and a sensor that can detect vessel positions. It can be used for a range of activities, including border control, monitoring naval traffic, search and rescue, and environmental protection. Data from the RPAS can be recorded and transferred to the EMSA RPAS data centre in real time, and then made immediately available to national authorities.